Articles Tagged with Boston bicycle accident

Published on:

A bicyclist in Cambridge was struck and killed in Inman Square recently, prompting a vigil and a lasting memorial we’ve come to see with increasing commonality in Boston: The ghost bike. bikememorial

The 27-year-old cyclist, Amanda Phillips, was allegedly hit by a landscaping truck at the intersection of Cambridge and Hampshire Streets around 12:15 p.m. on a Thursday afternoon. She was in critical condition following the crash and was transported to Mass. General Hospital, where she was pronounced dead.

Witnesses told investigators Phillips either swerved to avoid an opening door of a sport utility vehicle or was actually struck by the door and thrown into the path of the truck. One nearby resident told reporters the Cambridge intersection has been a huge problem for decades, and it’s gotten even worse as the number of bicyclists has ballooned in recent years.  Continue reading

Published on:

Boston bicyclists band together. We are all part of the same family, and it’s imperative that we support one another, especially when it comes to cycling safety. bikelane

It is in this spirit that our Boston bike injury lawyers urge Massachusetts cyclists to contact their state representatives for urgent requests to co-sponsor certain budget amendments considered central to bicycle safety.

Continue reading

Published on:

Boston has a long history of bicycle-friendly initiatives and for years has encouraged residents to take up riding as a way to cut down on pollution, overcrowded roads and personal health issues. askingfordirections

But now, Boston and many other cities across the U.S. are targeting tourists to get into the cycling groove. Perhaps that is no surprise because as some tourism officials have noted, bicycle tourists tend to stay longer, spend more money and support smaller towns and locally-owned bed-and-breakfasts, craft breweries, cafes and small shops. That’s compared to other tourists, who generally look for the nationally-recognized chains.

It’s not the largest niche in tourism, but it’s one of the most lucrative. To see evidence of that, consider the many states that are investing in efforts to accommodate out-of-town cyclists.  Continue reading

Published on:

Boston has been encouraging more and more people to jump on the bicycle bandwagon, and that means motorists have to be especially watchful as they navigate city streets. bicycleincity

Unfortunately, many drivers aren’t used to looking for them. Cyclists know they should wear bright clothing in the day and they are required to affix their bikes with lights and reflectors if heading out at night. But they can’t help that a bicycle is simply a smaller profile than a car, and drivers have to be mindful of this fact – and expect they will encounter bicycles every trip.

Hubway, Boston’s bike share program, reports there has been a 100 percent increase in riders since 2007. While there are currently 82 miles of bike lanes installed to date, the city plans to install some 360 in the next 20-to-30 years. The point is: Cyclists aren’t going anywhere. By committing to bolstering cycling safety, drivers not only do a service to the community, they help themselves by reducing the chances of a collision, which could result in substantial fines, higher insurance rates and even criminal charges. Continue reading

Published on:

Many in Boston have dedicated themselves to a healthier lifestyle in 2016, and for some, that means participating in a cycling routine. That can involve commuting to work by bike at least a few days a week or it can mean simply taking one out for recreation on the weekends. bicycle12

Boston bicycle ridership has grown exponentially since 2007, when former Mayor Thomas Menino launched Boston Bikes. With more than 60,000 bicycle trips made just within the Hubway share ridership program annually (and more than 1.5 million since the program was launched) the city has vowed to slash the cycling injury rate by half by 2020. The 30-year Bike Network Plan involves construction of 356 miles of bike facilities in the city, and the city is continuing to dedicate resources to renovating existing roads under the “Complete Streets” model.

In a recent three-year span, the city reported 1,700 confirmed bicycle accidents to which Boston emergency medical technicians responded. Another survey by Boston Bikes indicated there were more than 2,550 crashes that occurred during that time.

As cycling grows in popularity, it becomes incumbent on all of us to work toward a safer environment for cyclists. That often begins with the cyclist, and the outset of a new year is a good time to get started. Continue reading