Articles Posted in Boston bicycle lawyer

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Marshall “Major” Taylor, also known as the “Worcester Whirlwind” was a champion bicyclist who broke world records and competed around the globe at the turn of the century. He was also a black man. He started racing professionally at age 18 and in a single year, by 1900, he held several major world records and had competed in events around the globe. Intense racism, however, was always an uphill battle for Taylor, who retired at age 32. autumnbike

Now, a giant banner will show him, steely-faced on two wheels, on the side of the Casey Storage Solutions on McKeon Road, visible to motorists on Interstate 290. As the Worcester Telegram reports, the 23-foot image sites alongside basketball player Bob Cousy, an astronaut suit designed by the David Clark Co. and a distinctive neon sign that depicts Coney Island Hot Dogs.

News of the $100,000 banner project comes just ahead of the Gran Fono New England KMC Cross-Fest bicycle race, which benefits the Major Taylor Association. The Gran Fono race offers both challenge and enjoyment for riders of all skill level. The four different routes will each weave through the breath-taking autumn landscapes of New England. Passing through small towns, farms and stunning fall foliage, riders will have the opportunity to ride through Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island, with portions covered by hard-packed gravel and others fully-paved. There will be competitions on each route, but competition is optional.  Continue reading

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Many in Boston have dedicated themselves to a healthier lifestyle in 2016, and for some, that means participating in a cycling routine. That can involve commuting to work by bike at least a few days a week or it can mean simply taking one out for recreation on the weekends. bicycle12

Boston bicycle ridership has grown exponentially since 2007, when former Mayor Thomas Menino launched Boston Bikes. With more than 60,000 bicycle trips made just within the Hubway share ridership program annually (and more than 1.5 million since the program was launched) the city has vowed to slash the cycling injury rate by half by 2020. The 30-year Bike Network Plan involves construction of 356 miles of bike facilities in the city, and the city is continuing to dedicate resources to renovating existing roads under the “Complete Streets” model.

In a recent three-year span, the city reported 1,700 confirmed bicycle accidents to which Boston emergency medical technicians responded. Another survey by Boston Bikes indicated there were more than 2,550 crashes that occurred during that time.

As cycling grows in popularity, it becomes incumbent on all of us to work toward a safer environment for cyclists. That often begins with the cyclist, and the outset of a new year is a good time to get started. Continue reading