Articles Tagged with Boston bicycle accident lawyer

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Should new bike lanes be added to Massachusetts Avenue? sharetheroad

The question has sparked a heated debate, as many fear that the precious few parking spaces that exist along the road will evaporate if we prioritize pedalcyclists.

But bike safety advocates say it’s simple: “Save Lives, Not Parking.”

Massachusetts Avenue has seen more fatal crashes than anywhere else in the city, and bicycle accidents are a top concern. The city has vowed to be create a more bike-friendly atmosphere, and that means making sure that bicyclists are safe to ride where it’s legal for them to do so. That’s the driving force behind the initiative to install protected bike lanes along Mass. Ave. That’s going to mean posts being installed between car lanes and cyclist lanes.  Continue reading

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May is National Bike Month, and whether you bike to work or school or just for fun, you deserve to be safe. Bike lanes are one of the best roadway features we have to ensure that. bikerace

There has been some debate nationally about whether bicycle lanes are worth the time and effort. Fortunately, there is ample evidence to support the argument that bicycle lanes are cost-effective, promote cycling and help protect bicyclists from the many roadway hazards posed by motor vehicles. Here, our bike accident lawyers in Boston wanted to outline some of the bike lane research and what it could mean for Boston to have more bike lanes.

The City of Boston in its 30-year Boston Bike Network Plan has called for a comprehensive network of cycling routes – including on-road bicycle lanes – across 356 miles. The goal is to have 195 of those miles in place by 2018. The plan specifically states that when it comes to the primary routes – those that are the “spine” of the network and which provide long-distance routes across the city – leaders are prioritizing a separation from traffic in order to provide a low-stress, comfortable experience for cyclists of all ages. On secondary routes, which connect to schools, neighborhoods, parks, and transit hubs, the city is largely focused on installation of bike lanes, contra-flow lanes and priority shared lanes.  Continue reading

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What if it were possible to go back in time and see exactly what the outcome would have been if you had done things differently?bicyclists3

That’s what scientists with the KTH Royal Institute of Technology worked to accomplish in “rewinding” three bicycle accident scenarios in which the cyclists were not wearing helmets.

The videos offer reenactments of three different bicycle accident scenarios – showing the exact portions of the cyclists’ brains that suffer injury. Then, the researchers reenact those very same crashes to show how it would have gone differently had the rider been wearing a helmet at the time of impact. Continue reading

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Late last year, Massachusetts state Rep., Steven Howitt (R-Seekonk), introduced a bill that would ban bicyclists in the Commonwealth from wearing headphones while they ride. bike

He reasoned that, “If they want to share the road, they have to share the responsibility as well.”

Certainly, there is a case to be made that bicyclists need to be alert at all times when navigating through traffic. It’s really more for their own protection than anything else. But are efforts to crack down on distracted cycling really going to slash the number of bicycle accidents in Boston and elsewhere?

A recent analysis by the Pew Charitable Trusts suggests probably not. That’s because the real problem isn’t biking while distracted. It’s driving while distracted.  Continue reading

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Boston has been encouraging more and more people to jump on the bicycle bandwagon, and that means motorists have to be especially watchful as they navigate city streets. bicycleincity

Unfortunately, many drivers aren’t used to looking for them. Cyclists know they should wear bright clothing in the day and they are required to affix their bikes with lights and reflectors if heading out at night. But they can’t help that a bicycle is simply a smaller profile than a car, and drivers have to be mindful of this fact – and expect they will encounter bicycles every trip.

Hubway, Boston’s bike share program, reports there has been a 100 percent increase in riders since 2007. While there are currently 82 miles of bike lanes installed to date, the city plans to install some 360 in the next 20-to-30 years. The point is: Cyclists aren’t going anywhere. By committing to bolstering cycling safety, drivers not only do a service to the community, they help themselves by reducing the chances of a collision, which could result in substantial fines, higher insurance rates and even criminal charges. Continue reading

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Many in Boston have dedicated themselves to a healthier lifestyle in 2016, and for some, that means participating in a cycling routine. That can involve commuting to work by bike at least a few days a week or it can mean simply taking one out for recreation on the weekends. bicycle12

Boston bicycle ridership has grown exponentially since 2007, when former Mayor Thomas Menino launched Boston Bikes. With more than 60,000 bicycle trips made just within the Hubway share ridership program annually (and more than 1.5 million since the program was launched) the city has vowed to slash the cycling injury rate by half by 2020. The 30-year Bike Network Plan involves construction of 356 miles of bike facilities in the city, and the city is continuing to dedicate resources to renovating existing roads under the “Complete Streets” model.

In a recent three-year span, the city reported 1,700 confirmed bicycle accidents to which Boston emergency medical technicians responded. Another survey by Boston Bikes indicated there were more than 2,550 crashes that occurred during that time.

As cycling grows in popularity, it becomes incumbent on all of us to work toward a safer environment for cyclists. That often begins with the cyclist, and the outset of a new year is a good time to get started. Continue reading