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May is National Bike Month, and whether you bike to work or school or just for fun, you deserve to be safe. Bike lanes are one of the best roadway features we have to ensure that. bikerace

There has been some debate nationally about whether bicycle lanes are worth the time and effort. Fortunately, there is ample evidence to support the argument that bicycle lanes are cost-effective, promote cycling and help protect bicyclists from the many roadway hazards posed by motor vehicles. Here, our bike accident lawyers in Boston wanted to outline some of the bike lane research and what it could mean for Boston to have more bike lanes.

The City of Boston in its 30-year Boston Bike Network Plan has called for a comprehensive network of cycling routes – including on-road bicycle lanes – across 356 miles. The goal is to have 195 of those miles in place by 2018. The plan specifically states that when it comes to the primary routes – those that are the “spine” of the network and which provide long-distance routes across the city – leaders are prioritizing a separation from traffic in order to provide a low-stress, comfortable experience for cyclists of all ages. On secondary routes, which connect to schools, neighborhoods, parks, and transit hubs, the city is largely focused on installation of bike lanes, contra-flow lanes and priority shared lanes.  Continue reading

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The City of Boston has announced it will dedicate nearly $10 million over the course of three years – starting in fiscal year 2017 – to improving the safety of bicyclists and pedestrians. bikeride

Whereas the Boston Vision Zero initiative had originally been allocated $500,000 annually in funding, city council recently upped it to six times that amount, citing the ongoing commitment to reduce auto accident injuries and fatalities to zero.

Boston bike accident attorney Andrew Fischer is actively involved in promoting Vision Zero as part of a task force working under the auspices of State Senator Will Brownsberger and including a coalition of bicycle and pedestrian advocacy groups. Attorney Fischer, a former MASSBIKE president and longtime board member, met last month with Attorney General Maura Healey and a team from the Attorney General’s office to garner her support. The issue is one of public safety.

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Boston bicyclists band together. We are all part of the same family, and it’s imperative that we support one another, especially when it comes to cycling safety. bikelane

It is in this spirit that our Boston bike injury lawyers urge Massachusetts cyclists to contact their state representatives for urgent requests to co-sponsor certain budget amendments considered central to bicycle safety.

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What if it were possible to go back in time and see exactly what the outcome would have been if you had done things differently?bicyclists3

That’s what scientists with the KTH Royal Institute of Technology worked to accomplish in “rewinding” three bicycle accident scenarios in which the cyclists were not wearing helmets.

The videos offer reenactments of three different bicycle accident scenarios – showing the exact portions of the cyclists’ brains that suffer injury. Then, the researchers reenact those very same crashes to show how it would have gone differently had the rider been wearing a helmet at the time of impact. Continue reading

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Late last year, Massachusetts state Rep., Steven Howitt (R-Seekonk), introduced a bill that would ban bicyclists in the Commonwealth from wearing headphones while they ride. bike

He reasoned that, “If they want to share the road, they have to share the responsibility as well.”

Certainly, there is a case to be made that bicyclists need to be alert at all times when navigating through traffic. It’s really more for their own protection than anything else. But are efforts to crack down on distracted cycling really going to slash the number of bicycle accidents in Boston and elsewhere?

A recent analysis by the Pew Charitable Trusts suggests probably not. That’s because the real problem isn’t biking while distracted. It’s driving while distracted.  Continue reading

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Boston has a long history of bicycle-friendly initiatives and for years has encouraged residents to take up riding as a way to cut down on pollution, overcrowded roads and personal health issues. askingfordirections

But now, Boston and many other cities across the U.S. are targeting tourists to get into the cycling groove. Perhaps that is no surprise because as some tourism officials have noted, bicycle tourists tend to stay longer, spend more money and support smaller towns and locally-owned bed-and-breakfasts, craft breweries, cafes and small shops. That’s compared to other tourists, who generally look for the nationally-recognized chains.

It’s not the largest niche in tourism, but it’s one of the most lucrative. To see evidence of that, consider the many states that are investing in efforts to accommodate out-of-town cyclists.  Continue reading

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The growing number of cyclists in Boston has been great for the environment, for personal health and for the city’s culture. The U.S. Census Bureau reported that of the 318,000 employees in Boston, 1.7 percent biked to work. That’s a 70 percent increase from the number who did so in 2000. That doesn’t include the number who have picked up the activity for recreation or those who do so as a way to get to and from classes. bicyclist21

Our Boston bike attorneys are thrilled at the traction the sport has gotten in recent years. But we also recognize it has also coincided with an uptick of bicycle accidents.

Most serious bicycle accidents in Boston happen as a result of a car or other vehicle colliding with a cyclist. Cyclists are often competing with drivers and pedestrians for space as they navigate through construction, gridlocked intersections and double-parked vehicles. Whether it’s “dooring” or being cut off by a driver who doesn’t see you, cyclists are taking a risk every day. Many may have grounds for compensation for those injuries, but obtaining it can be tough without an experienced attorney.  Continue reading

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Boston bike riders are daily dodging large trucks, drivers who are distracted and vehicles that are double-parked. They are doing so on fast-paced roads that more often than not were designed without consideration of their existence. bicycle1

From 2010 to 2015, more than a dozen people were killed on city streets, ranging in age from 8 to 74. In each case, riders were struck by motor vehicles – buses, cars and massive trucks without side guards to stop them from falling underneath.

The Boston Globe reported last year that Boston has more cycling deaths per 10,000 commuters than Washington D.C., Portland, Seattle, Denver and Minneapolis – all cities of similar sizes where, like here, bike travel is increasingly popular.  Continue reading

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Just the thought of spring makes winter-weary Bostonians itch to get back on their bikes. bicycles

All but the most dedicated cyclists are forced to halt or significantly curb their riding during the colder months in Massachusetts. From November to March, roads and bike paths are caked with alternating layers of snow, slush, ice and gravely salt and sand, making the going too tough for all but the most ardent.

But higher temperatures and clearer skies don’t make the roads automatically safe for cyclists. May is national cycling month, but there is no reason you can’t get a head start. There are a few things you should consider before heading out for your first ride of the season.  Continue reading

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Boston has been encouraging more and more people to jump on the bicycle bandwagon, and that means motorists have to be especially watchful as they navigate city streets. bicycleincity

Unfortunately, many drivers aren’t used to looking for them. Cyclists know they should wear bright clothing in the day and they are required to affix their bikes with lights and reflectors if heading out at night. But they can’t help that a bicycle is simply a smaller profile than a car, and drivers have to be mindful of this fact – and expect they will encounter bicycles every trip.

Hubway, Boston’s bike share program, reports there has been a 100 percent increase in riders since 2007. While there are currently 82 miles of bike lanes installed to date, the city plans to install some 360 in the next 20-to-30 years. The point is: Cyclists aren’t going anywhere. By committing to bolstering cycling safety, drivers not only do a service to the community, they help themselves by reducing the chances of a collision, which could result in substantial fines, higher insurance rates and even criminal charges. Continue reading